Green Deal Ship’s waste chain

The Kingdom, ports and business sector are closing Green Deal ship waste and plastic

Minister Schultz van Haegen (Infrastructure and the Environment), five Dutch ports, the Royal Association of Dutch Shipowners (KVNR), waste collectors (including Martens Havenontvangstinstallatie), ship suppliers, the Human Environment and Transport Inspectorate (ILT) and the North Sea Foundation have jointly signed 10 September 2014. the Green Deal Shipwaste chain signed. The parties are committed, among other things, to limit the amount of waste on board through waste prevention in the supply of ships. Plastic waste will be better stored on board separately and collected separately in the ports. The collected plastic will be recycled as much as possible.

Strong international position

“Today we are taking a step towards reducing plastic waste at sea,” Minister Schultz explains. “With this Green Deal, we are not only committed to keeping the blue heart of our planet alive, we also contribute to a strong international position of our maritime sector, and thus to our ambitions for a competitive strong and sustainable economy. ”

Global sector

In order to limit the differences in waste delivery between European ports, Minister Schultz is committed to harmonizing financing and enforcement at bilateral, regional and EU level. In addition, it is important that plastic is also collected separately in ports outside the Netherlands. Schultz: “We have to prevent a captain and his crew from separating waste on board and that in harbors outside the Netherlands everything ends up in one heap.In short, it is a task for us all to bring this Green Deal on an international level.” Follow-up is important: shipping is a global sector and marine litter does not stick to borders. In addition, enforcement and supervision remains necessary to achieve results.

Drop in ports

The Dutch maritime sector has already taken significant steps forward in recent years. International regulations became stricter in 2013. There is now a general ban on dumping rubbish at sea. More and more ships are delivering their waste in Dutch ports. In 2005 a total of 100,000 cubic meters was issued, in 2013 almost 260,000 cubic meters. That is 13,000 full garbage trucks. In 2005, 1 in 3 ships abandoned their waste at the start of a Dutch port; in 2013, 2 out of 3 vessels did so.
Approximately 80 percent of the country’s marine litter is collected worldwide and 20 percent of shipping and fishing. For the North Sea this ratio is 60% of the country and 40% of shipping and fishing (Beach Monitor). Floating litter at sea consists of about three-quarters of plastic. Fish eat between 12 and 24 million kilos of plastic every year.

Signers

The Green Deal is signed by:
– Melanie Schultz van Haegen, Minister for Infrastructure and the Environment
– Tineke Netelenbos, KNVR
– Ronald Paul, Port of Rotterdam Authority
– René de Vries, Harbor Master Rotterdam
– Dertje Meijer, Port of Amsterdam
– Janine van Oosten, Harbor Master Amsterdam
– Harm Post, Groningen Seaports
– Gaston Suy, Zeeland Seaports
– Piet-Hein Kolff, Port of Den Helder
– Daan van Mullem, Association of Companies in Environmental Services for the benefit of Shipping (VOMS)
– Dirk Cupido, Dutch Association of Ship Suppliers (NVVS)
– Kenny Baas, Bek and Verburg, Maritime waste specialists
– Jan Hoondert, Martens Havenontvangstinstallatie Vlissingen B.V.
– Jenny Thunnissen, Human Environment and Transport Inspectorate (ILT)
– Eelco Leemans, Stichting De Noordzee

 

Information
Client Royal Association of Dutch Shipowners
Date Medio 2014
Work Green Deal

The Kingdom, ports and business sector are closing Green Deal ship waste and plastic

Minister Schultz van Haegen (Infrastructure and the Environment), five Dutch ports, the Royal Association of Dutch Shipowners (KVNR), waste collectors (including Martens Havenontvangstinstallatie), ship suppliers, the Human Environment and Transport Inspectorate (ILT) and the North Sea Foundation have jointly signed 10 September 2014. the Green Deal Shipwaste chain signed. The parties are committed, among other things, to limit the amount of waste on board through waste prevention in the supply of ships. Plastic waste will be better stored on board separately and collected separately in the ports. The collected plastic will be recycled as much as possible.

Strong international position

“Today we are taking a step towards reducing plastic waste at sea,” Minister Schultz explains. “With this Green Deal, we are not only committed to keeping the blue heart of our planet alive, we also contribute to a strong international position of our maritime sector, and thus to our ambitions for a competitive strong and sustainable economy. ”

Global sector

In order to limit the differences in waste delivery between European ports, Minister Schultz is committed to harmonizing financing and enforcement at bilateral, regional and EU level. In addition, it is important that plastic is also collected separately in ports outside the Netherlands. Schultz: “We have to prevent a captain and his crew from separating waste on board and that in harbors outside the Netherlands everything ends up in one heap.In short, it is a task for us all to bring this Green Deal on an international level.” Follow-up is important: shipping is a global sector and marine litter does not stick to borders. In addition, enforcement and supervision remains necessary to achieve results.

Drop in ports

The Dutch maritime sector has already taken significant steps forward in recent years. International regulations became stricter in 2013. There is now a general ban on dumping rubbish at sea. More and more ships are delivering their waste in Dutch ports. In 2005 a total of 100,000 cubic meters was issued, in 2013 almost 260,000 cubic meters. That is 13,000 full garbage trucks. In 2005, 1 in 3 ships abandoned their waste at the start of a Dutch port; in 2013, 2 out of 3 vessels did so.
Approximately 80 percent of the country’s marine litter is collected worldwide and 20 percent of shipping and fishing. For the North Sea this ratio is 60% of the country and 40% of shipping and fishing (Beach Monitor). Floating litter at sea consists of about three-quarters of plastic. Fish eat between 12 and 24 million kilos of plastic every year.

Signers

The Green Deal is signed by:
– Melanie Schultz van Haegen, Minister for Infrastructure and the Environment
– Tineke Netelenbos, KNVR
– Ronald Paul, Port of Rotterdam Authority
– René de Vries, Harbor Master Rotterdam
– Dertje Meijer, Port of Amsterdam
– Janine van Oosten, Harbor Master Amsterdam
– Harm Post, Groningen Seaports
– Gaston Suy, Zeeland Seaports
– Piet-Hein Kolff, Port of Den Helder
– Daan van Mullem, Association of Companies in Environmental Services for the benefit of Shipping (VOMS)
– Dirk Cupido, Dutch Association of Ship Suppliers (NVVS)
– Kenny Baas, Bek and Verburg, Maritime waste specialists
– Jan Hoondert, Martens Havenontvangstinstallatie Vlissingen B.V.
– Jenny Thunnissen, Human Environment and Transport Inspectorate (ILT)
– Eelco Leemans, Stichting De Noordzee